The Museum of Family History
HONORING AND PRESERVING THE MEMORY OF OUR ANCESTORS
FOR THE PRESENT AND FUTURE GENERATIONS


 

  THE BURAK-GNIAZDOWICZ WING 

 Second Floor

 The Max and Fannie Burack Room

MAX BURACK AT ROZ & JERRY'S WEDDING

18 April 1948

President Chateau

Brooklyn, New York

 

Max Burack was the first of four of my grandmother's four brothers from Jedwabne to emigrate. He somehow first found his way to England from Russian Poland, and then left from Liverpool, arriving in the United States in January 1913. He arrived barely one year before his sister Flora's wedding.

"I remember as a little girl, when I knew he was going to come home, waiting at the corner for him to come...I didn't care if I had to stand there a half-hour, until I saw him, and I would run (to him), because he was very affectionate. He was very affectionate to my mother, and we was very affectionate to us." -daughter Roz

Fannie, nee Feiga Gusiacki, lived across the street from her husband Max while both were living in Jedwabne. It is said that they were childhood sweethearts. She immigrated in the summer of 1921, and they were married one-and-a-half years later. They lived in the East New York section of Brooklyn, and raised two children, Roz and Aaron.

"I'll tell you a story about my mother and father...You gotta picture this. My father, you know, working these numerous hours schlepping furniture. My mother used to come home, and she was like a seamstress, you know, working piecework with gloves (sewing on pearls)...She used to do the work in the house...But their biggest achievement, for all the work they did...They went to Thomas Jefferson High School to learn to become a citizen, and that's the biggest thing I remember, that to become a citizen of this country was the biggest challenge that they, you know, could do...My mother spoke in the house- they spoke Yiddish-but to us they all spoke, you know, broken English, whatever English they (knew.) They used to go (to school) at night together...They had a tremendous pride that they were now a citizen of the United States...(They felt that) even though you may live in poverty, let's say, compared to our standards today, you have the freedom of religion, which they always said they were persecuted for. And what my mother used to say to me was, she never had to look over her shoulder.." -son Aaron


The Sam and Fannie Burack Room
The Sam Burack Room
The Gusiackis from  Jedwabne

 


 


 


 



 




 

 

 

 

 

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