THE MUSEUM OF FAMILY HISTORY
EDUCATION AND RESEARCH CENTER
presents

In the Matter of Jacob Cohen
ON HIS NATURALIZATION
 

  HOME            SITE MAP            ABOUT THE MUSEUM            FEEDBACK            OPPORTUNITIES            LINKS 

 
Here we will take a look at a particular "old law" naturalization record for an immigrant named Jacob Cohen, for five years residing in the United States, hoping to gain citizenship in the first few years of the twentieth century. Though such naturalization forms as these have changed to varying degrees over time according to the laws of the land, it is nevertheless interesting to learn what was required of the perspective citizen and perhaps what questions might have been asked of them in order to gain citizenship.
Also, one might want to speculate about the state of the world during that time, whether it be in a country such as 1903 Russia, or the United States, and how it might have influenced or hastened the declaring of an individual's intention to become a U.S. citizen.
You will see an additional set of questions asked by the Supreme Court of the petitioner and the witnesses in August 1905, including questions about beliefs in government, e.g., are they anarchists? Perhaps this is not to be unexpected as in January 1905 the Russian Revolution began (January 22, noted as "Black Sunday," when more than 1,000 were killed and injured by Russian troops during an otherwise peaceful march in St. Petersburg, Russia.)
 
JACOB COHEN
Jacob Cohen became a United States citizen in 1905, having first arrived in the States in 1898. He waited five years, and in 1903 declared his intention to become a citizen. He applied to become a citizen through the Supreme Court of the State of New York, First Judicial District. His path to citizenship occurred in three stages.
 
 THE DECLARATION OF INTENTION
18 Jun 1903

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

STATE OF NEW YORK,           }
                                                 ss:
City and County of New York, }


Be it Remembered,
That on the 18 day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and three personally appeared Jacob Cohen in the Supreme Court of the State of New York, First Judicial District, (said Court being a Court of Record, having common law jurisdiction, a Clerk and a Seal,) and made his Declaration of Intention to become a Citizen of the United States of America in the words following, to wit:

"I, Jacob Cohen do declare on oath, that it is bona fide my Intention to become a Citizen of the United States of America, and to renounce forever all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign Prince, Potentate, State or Sovereignty whatever, and particularly to the Emperor of Russia of whom I am now a subject (and that I arrived in the United States on the 10 day of March 1898)."
Sworn to this 18 day of June 1903 } Jacob Cohen, Residence 242 E. 104th St., N.Y. City.
John W. Juntzer (?), Ant. Special Deputy Clerk.

IN ATTESTATION WHEREOF,
and the foregoing is a true copy of the original Declaration of Intention remaining of record in my office, I, THOS. L. HAMILTON, Clerk of the said Court, have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed the seal of said Court, this 18 day of June 1903.
signed Thos. L. Hamilton, Clerk.

 

 PETITION FOR NATURALIZATION
17 Jul 1905

FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT
In the matter of the Application of Jacob Cohen             }
to be admitted as a Citizen of United States of America }
To the Supreme Court of the State of New York:

 

This certificate was posted five days later, on 22 Jul 1905.
No. 19397
The City of New York
City Clerk's Office, Borough of Manhattan.

I HEREBY CERTIFY THAT Jacob Cohen, an applicant to be admitted to become a Citizen of the United States, has complied with the provisions of Section 4 Chapter 927 of the Laws of 1895, by serving upon me a notice containing the following particulars:
 
DATE OF
RECEIPT OF
NOTICE
DATE OF
HEARING OF
PETITION
NAME AGE OCCUPATION RESIDENCE
July 17, 1905 July 17, 1905 Jacob Cohen 31 Cutter 330 East 15th St.
 

  

The petition is pending in the Supreme Court of the (County of New York) State of New York.

P.J.Seully (?), City Clerk
Posted July 22, 1905
 

 AFFIDAVITS, ETC.
2 Aug 1905
SUPREME COURT OF THE  STATE OF  NEW YORK.
FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT.

IN THE MATTER OF Jacob Cohen ON HIS NATURALIZATION
AFFIDAVITS, ETC.
Filed in open Court 2 Aug 1905
Jos. L. Mc Neirny
...
clerk of the County of New York in... the transaction of...and naturalization.....

 

SUPREME COURT OF THE  STATE OF  NEW YORK.
FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF Jacob Cohen,
By occupation a cutter.
Applicant arrived in U.S.10 March 1898.
Witness became acquainted with  applicant  15 March 1899.
TO BE ADMITTED A CITIZEN OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

STATE OF NEW YORK,                           }
                  City and County of New York, } ss: 
Wolf Eisenstadt
being duly sworn, says he resides at No. 17 St. Marks Place Street, in the City of New York; that he is a Citizen of the United States; that he is well acquainted with the above-named applicant; that the said applicant has resided within the United States of New York one year at least immediately preceding this application;  and that, during that time, he has behaved as a man of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States and well disposed to the good order and happiness of the same. That the said applicant does not disbelieve in nor is he opposed to organized government; that said applicant is not a member of or affiliated with  any organization entertaining or teaching such disbelief in or opposition to organized government; that said applicant does not advocate or teach the duty, necessity or propriety of the unlawful assaulting or killing of any officer or officers, or of specific individuals or of officers generally, of the Government of the United States or of any organized government, because of his or their official character, and that the said applicant has not violated any of the provisions of the Act of Congress entitled "An Act to regulate the Immigration of Aliens into the United States," approved March 3, 1903.
Sworn in open Court, this 2nd August 1905 } Wolf Eisenstadt,
WITNESS.
Jos. L. Mc Neirny
....

STATE OF NEW YORK,                           }
                  City and County of New York, } ss:
Jacob Cohen
residing in No. 230 East 15th St., N.Y.C. do solemnly swear that I will support the Constitution of the United States; and that I do absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to every foreign Prince, Potentate, State or Sovereignty whatever, and particularly to the Emperor of Russia of whom I was before a subject. Petitioner further deposes and says: that he does not believe in nor is he opposed to organized government; that he is not a member of or affiliated with any organization entertaining or teaching such disbelief in or opposition to organized government; that he does not advocate or teach the duty, necessity or propriety of the unlawful assaulting or killing of any officer or officers, or of specific individuals or of officers generally, of the Government of the United States or of any other organized government, because of his or their official character, and that he has not violated any of the provisions of the Act of Congress entitled "An  Act to regulate the Immigration of Aliens into the United States," approved March 3, 1903.
Sworn in open Court, this 2nd August 1905 } Jacob Cohen,
WITNESS.
Jos. L. Mc Neirny
 
 AFFIDAVITS, ETC.: SUPREME COURT, SPECIAL TERM, PART II

In the matter of the Application of JACOB COHEN, by occupation, a CUTTER, to be admitted as a Citizen of the United States of America.
Examination of applicant and witness before HON. JAMES FITZGERALD, JUSTICE,
NEW YORK, AUGUST 2, 1905.

WOLF EISENSTADT, called as a witness on behalf of the applicant, and being duly sworn, testifies as follows:

Q. Are you a citizen of the United States? A. Yes sir.
Q. How long have you known the applicant to reside within the United States? A. Since '99.
Q. March '99? A. Yes, sir.
Q. And in the State of New York? A. Yes sir.
Q. How often do you see him, every day, week or  month. A: Every week.
Q. Man of good character? A. Yes sir.
Q. Is he opposed to organized government, or does he believe in organized government? A. He believes in organized government.
Q. Is he a member of or affiliated with any organization in opposition to organized government? A. No sir.
Q. Not an anarchist? A. No sir.
Q. You are not an anarchist? A. No sir.
Witness takes oath.

JACOB COHEN, the applicant called as a witness in his own behalf, and being duly sworn, testifies as follows:

Q. How long have you lived within the United States? A. 7 years.
Q. Since '98? A. Yes sir.
Q. And in the State of New York? A. Yes sir.
Q. All that time? A. Yes sir.
Q. Have you read the Constitution of the United States? A. Yes sir.
Q. What form of government have we in this country? A. Republic.
Q. Who makes the laws for the United States, at Washington? A. Congress.
Q. Who makes the laws for the State of New York, at Albany? A. Legislature.
Q. How many Senators have we from each state to Washington? A. Two.
Q. Are you opposed to organized government or do you believe in organized government? A. I believe in organized government.
Q. Are you a member of or affiliated with any organization in opposition to organized government? A. No sir.
Q. Don't belong to any society against the laws of  this country? A. No sir.
Q. Not an anarchist, A. No sir.
Q. Don't believe in anarchy? A. No sir.
Q. Never been convicted of a crime? A. No sir.
Q. You do solemnly swear that you will support the Constitution of the United States, and that you do absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to every foreign prince, potentate, state or sovereignty whatever, and particularly to the, EMPEROR OF RUSSIA, of whom you were before a subject; and you further swear that you do not disbelieve in nor are you opposed to organized government; that you are not a member of affiliated with any organization entertaining or teaching such disbelief in or  opposition to organized government; that you do not advocate or teach the duty necessity or propriety of the unlawful assaulting or killing of any officer or officers or of specific individuals or of officers generally of the government of the United States, or of any other organized government, because of his or their official character, and that you have not violated any of the provisions of the act of Congress, entitled " An act to regulate the Immigration of Aliens into the United States," approved March 3, 1903, do you so swear so help you God?" A. Yes sir.

The judgment of the Court is that the applicant be admitted as a Citizen of the United States of America.
The stenographer is ordered to make a transcript of the proceedings taken in the foregoing application, and to file such a transcript.
AT A SPECIAL TERM OF THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE  OF NEW YORK,
FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT held in the Court House of the City of New York, on the 2 day of August 1905.
PRESENT, Hon. James Fitzgerald, JUSTICE.

IN THE  MATTER OF THE Application of the within-named applicant to be admitted a citizen of the United States of America }

The above named applicant having applied to be admitted a citizen of the United States pursuant to the directions of the Act of Congress of the United States entitled "An Act to Establish an Uniform Rule of Naturalization, etc., "  passed April 14, 1802, and the acts subsequently passed on that subject, and to the directions of the Act of Congress entitled "An Act to regulate the Immigration of Aliens into the United States," approved March 3, 1903, and appearing personally in Court, producing such evidence and affidavits and  making such declarations and renunciations, and taking such oaths as are by the said acts required, and it appearing to the Court that the said affidavits of the applicant and his witness are duly made and recorded, IT IS ORDERED by the said Court, that the said applicant be admitted to be a Citizen of the United States of America.

Enter
James Fitzgerald, J.S.C.
 
 

 

Copyright 2006 Museum of Family History. All rights reserved. Image Use Policy