THE MUSEUM OF FAMILY HISTORY presents

Guide to the United States
FOR
THE JEWISH IMMIGRANT

AN ABRIDGED NEARLY LITERAL TRANSLATION OF THE SECOND YIDDISH EDITION
from the 1916 book of the same name by John Foster Carr

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   LIVING IN AMERICA: THE JEWISH EXPERIENCE   |   EXHIBITION   |   NEXT ►►

MARRIAGES, BIRTHS, AND DEATHS


Marriage licenses are required in all states and territories except Alaska. California and New Mexico require man and woman both to appear and be examined under oath. These licenses are freely granted, without the difficulty of many formalities as required in many countries of Europe. Marriages in all states may be celebrated either religiously, by any minister of religion, or civilly, by the state officer who is empowered by law to perform marriage. And it is the duty of the minister or state officer to register the marriage with the proper authorities. But in many of the states, marriages between whites and negroes, or those of negro descent, or between whites and Indians, or whites and Chinese, are forbidden and punishable. In other states marriage is forbidden between first cousins, step relatives, or persons who are seriously defective or seriously diseased, either mentally or physically.

The marriage of a Jew contracted in America is recognized as valid everywhere in Europe, if it has been celebrated according to the formalities prescribed by American law. A marriage celebrated in any state of the United States by any Rabbi, or other minister of religion, is valid everywhere without the civil marriage that some European countries require when celebrated at home between their own subjects. But all immigrants are strongly advised, in their own interests, to guarantee their own civil rights and the rights of their heirs, to see that their certificate of marriage is carefully and exactly filled out in all its details. It is very important to preserve this with great care, no matter whether they intend to remain in the United States, or return to Europe.

BIRTHS-- It is the duty of every doctor or midwife who has assisted at the birth of a child, or if neither doctor nor midwife should have been present, of the parent or guardian, to file a notice of the birth within thirty days in the local office of the Board of Health, giving the name of the child, the date, and the names of the parents. The state does not use these records for enforcing military service, or for other forms of oppression. There is no conscription in the United States.

DEATHS-- A corpse may not be taken from one city to another, or buried, without permission of the Board of Health. This may only be had upon the certificate of the doctor who had care of the deceased, or of other responsible person attesting the name of the deceased, the time and circumstances of his death.

The violation of this law is punished by imprisonment.

 

 

 


 



 

 


 











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