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  ERC > LEXICON OF THE YIDDISH THEATRE  >  VOLUME 5  >  TSIPA ABELMAN


Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre
BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE WHO WERE ONCE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE;
aS FEATURED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S  "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"


VOLUME 5: THE KDOYSHIM (MARTYRS) EDITION, 1967, Mexico City

 

Tsipa Abelman


 

Tsipa was the wife of the famous singer-actor Benny Abelman.

According to Itzhak Fishelewitz, she was a tailor and worked in a factory, and only for a short time acted on the Yiddish stage.

When she was in America at the start of the twenties, where she acted with her husband in Yiddish vaudeville houses, she published an article in the "Forward" an article on 11 May 1905 under the name "Lozt men tsu naye aktorn?"

Returning to Poland, she participated in 1908 in the production of Jacob Gordin's "Brothers Lurie," and Noakh Prilutski writes about her acting:

"Frau Abelman (Sarah-Devorah)--not with much talent--but acts consistently with might and a great deal of endurance, and that in a rare appearance on the Yiddish stage."

When a cry went out in Warsaw for Abelman to act, she toured throughout the province with her husband, where she used to perform with concerts or with Hebrew evenings for "krn hisud" activities.

A. was a big factor in transforming her husband, who she had oysergeveynlekh farert, and she would often require that he be accorded respect as one of the nestorin of the Yiddish theatre.

According to the "Yizkor list" in the program of the State Theatre of Poland, Tsipa was killed by the Nazis in Poland.


M. E. from I. Fishelewitz.

  • Mrs. Abelman -- Lozt men tsu naye aktyorn?, "Forward," New York, 11 May 1905.

  • Noah Prilutski -- "Yidish teater," Bialystok, 1921, Vol. 1, pp. 145-146.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 5, page 4781.
 

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