ERC > LEXICON OF THE YIDDISH THEATRE  >  VOLUME 5  >  MENACHEM BLAKHER


Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre
BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE WHO WERE ONCE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE;
aS FEATURED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S  "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"


VOLUME 5: THE KDOYSHIM (MARTYRS) EDITION, 1967, Mexico City

 

Menachem (Mitye) Blakher

Brother of actor Shabtai Blakher.

There is no biographical data about him. It is certain that he was born in Vilna.

In the book "Twenty-one plus—one", the following was written about him:

Leyzer Ran writes:

"His [Shabtai's] brother, the artist Mitye [Menakhem] Blakher, a graduate of the first Yiddish dramatic studio in Vilna, [expresses?] sympathy for the greater Yiddish dramatic circle and co-author of a popular sketch 'iterkishe punctuality' (together with the artist Reuben-Alter Aguz),  with his wife [who were] killed on the arisher side. Their daughter oybergelebt bay a Christian friend and found herself in Mexico." [ By her Zanavitsh family, who adopted her.]

Avraham Morevsky writes:

"His brother Mitye [Menakhem] Blakher, a bright geshtalt, who began an historical existence and later went away from the theatre, was killed by a partisan's bullet.

In the uniform of a Polish officer he went into battle against Hitler's Germany. The Polish army fell, and he remained in a town as a teacher as a Pole. The Red partisans were attacked by the 'White Poles,' and their officer was shot.

And whom did they target? And what happened? That the Jewish intelligentsia was involved with the class-enemy whom the Red partisans had sought to eradicate?

Far from home, rejected, forgotten, not even worthy to be put into a Jewish brother's grave; Mitye Blakher remains somewhere in a field for [kroen un shakaln.]"

  • Sh. Blakher -- "Twenty-one plus—one," New York 1962, pp. 4, 91, 95, 97.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 5, page 4853.
 

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