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  ERC > LEXICON OF THE YIDDISH THEATRE  >  VOLUME 5  >  EVA SHTOKFEDER


Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre
BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE WHO WERE ONCE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE;
aS FEATURED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S  "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"


VOLUME 5: THE KDOYSHIM (MARTYRS) EDITION, 1967, Mexico City

 


 

Eva Shtokfeder
(Khava)
 

S. was a chorister in Yiddish theatre in Russia, and after her marriage to actor and future theatre entrepreneur Avraham Shtokfeder, she became a well-known actress in Yiddish theatre.

Arriving  with her husband in Poland, S. initially began to act as a soubrette, and then in character roles and had a great success, especially in operetta repertoire, where she played her roles in an exaggerated-elegant way, and with the "gay" men, and with the over-the-top, eye-catching costumes, this may have evoked laughter from the theatre audience.

Jonas Turkow characterizes her in this way:

"Eva Shtokfeder in her last years--when she had stopped playing soubrettes--there was a need for good, useful character actresses for the operettas and dramas, and she never was free of work. She was beloved by the public. Only she appeared on the stage; very tall and always dressed in colors that screamed out, with characteristic, large ostrich feathers in her hair, which even evoked great amusement in the hall. She spoke with a strong voice, which was taken up in faye areyn. On the stage she always played the woman of valor.

Also in her private life Eva Shtokfeder was very loved due to her good character and her giving nature to her friends. She was a prudent, intelligent woman and was very well-read in the Yiddish and secular literature. Both Shtokfeders were good, concerned parents

 


to their two children, for whom they had done everything, that they should develop into 'human beings,' and did not skimp on any money for their education. Their son, Artek Shtokfeder, was a fine pianist-accordionist; their daughter Anya a very pretty girl who went into the theatre. Her first performance was actually put on for us in Warsaw's ;Kamaral Stage.' In the role that she played, in Zofia Nalkovska's "The Days of His Return," she earned success. We saw for her beforehand a future for her in the theatre. Later she played with Ida Kaminska in her troupe until the war broke out."

Both children escaped from Poland and lived in Russia throughout the war. Their parents tried to flee, but they didn't make it. They remained in Warsaw with the Germans. In the ghetto S. worked in a "shop" on Milne Street with "haberdashery preparations." She also took part in Max Viskind's offering of Leon Kobrin's "The Village Youth." For the entire time she did not lose faith in a better tomorrow, but her husband was hugely pessimistic. during the famous "actions"--says Jonas Turkow-- they were still living in their apartment on Dzhike [sp] street. Every day, when her husband finished his day as comptroller and inspector of the recreational facilities in the Jewish social self-help [?], they used to go home together. During one "action" they successfully aroystsudreyen. On a specific day when the Nazis conducted a strong "action" on many street sections, Turkow asked them not to put themselves in danger, and not be go home, to stay with them. S. agreed, but her husband remained stubborn, to go home, and a face, that one the way the Germans caught them and led them to the gas chambers in Treblinka.

  • Jonas Turkow-- "Extinguished Stars," Buenos Aires, 1953, Vol. 1, pp. 87-88, 306-312.

 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 5, page 4381.
 

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