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 Postcards from Home 
 

Stawiski
POLAND



 
Photo title: Ester Kreplak
Family surnames: KREPLAK, FREJER, WAPNIARZ, BRANDENBURG
Place of residence: Stawiski, Poland
Date of photograph: prob 1930s

Ester Malka Frejer Kreplak(bef 1880-1942?), pictured left, was a widow before she married Shlomo Kreplak (d. 1906), and her daughter Rifka was from her first marriage. She lived on a farm in the outskirts of Stawiski selling grains for planting and for bread. Sholmo was a woodskeeper, which was rare for a Jewish person, as it was a political and well-paid position. The job came with a house in the woods.

The position gave the family the status of "elite," so they were under protection of the "nobility." It permitted the girls to go to school, which was rare for Jewish girls in those days. They spoke both Polish and Yiddish. 

During World War I, Ester kept a cow in the living room to keep the German's from finding it and eating it. The cow was used to provide fresh milk for the children.
Photo title: The Kreplak family
Places of residence: Stawiski, Poland; Argentina
Date of photograph: bef 1922

Enie Kreplak Wapniarz (1905-1979) is in the white dress. Her sister Chaja (Ida) (1902-1988) is standing next to her. Seated, left to right: her sister Rifka Brandenburg (bef 1900-1942?), Rifka's two children Leon (1919-1996), and Shejna Leja (cir 1918-1942?), and her husband Shlomo Brandenburg. 

Enie immigrated to Argentina in the 1932s, and Chaja came to the United States in September 1922. Leon was the only Brandenburg to escape in 1937, and stayed with his two aunts in Argentina. Enie and her sister Sara, both living at the time in Argentina, provided fares for all the Brandenburgs and their mother Ester Malka Kreplak, so that they could come to Argentina. Ester Malka wouldn't leave Poland as the trip would take one month and she wouldn't be able to get Kosher food on the ship. Rifka would not leave her mother. Ester Malka, Rifka, Shlomo and their children all perished in the Holocaust.




 


 

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