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 Postcards from Home 
 

Szczuczyn
POLAND



 

LEVI BOGINSKY IN BIALYSTOK
Hotel Orbis in background
Bialystok, Poland
cir 1936-39

Levi Boginsky was the youngest of five children. From the eldest to the youngest were sister Belke (who married a Szaja Mendel Kadish and moved to Stawiski, Poland), Yankef (Yakov) and Itchke (Itzhak), both of who married cir 1937, Sender and Levi. All except Sender and Levi presumably perished in the Holocaust.

Due to the increasing anti-Semitic activity by the Endeks (Polish National Democratic Party) that was occurring in Levi's home town of Szczuczyn, Poland, Levi, along with one of his brothers Sender, and their parents, Avram Eli (b. in Radzilow) and Chaya (nee Adelman) Boginsky (b. in Szczuczyn), moved to Bialystok in 1936, hoping that the pogromist's activities would not follow them there (address in Bialystok was Marmurowa 2.)

Unfortunately, Bialystok would eventually be involved in the second World War and a ghetto would be formed in Bialystok. Before this happened, Levi ran away (and his brother Sender to at a later date) to Russia. There he was conscripted quickly into the Russian army where he served for a year, saw combat in their infantry, later worked in a munitions factory in Russia. Later, after the war, he moved to Leningrad and married where he and his wife and raised two children. He immigrated to the United States in the early 1990s with his wife and two children. Levi eventually found his brother Sender, who he thought was lost to him for nineteen years. Sender, a wounded veteran, would remain in Russia for the remainder of his life.



 


 


 

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