Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Friedrich Filipesko
(Bleykher)


Born circa 1859 in Botoshan, Romania. Parents -- from the rich and important Jewish families in Bucharest. He learned in a gymnasium and became an expert in several European languages.

At age twenty-one, he entered into military service and became one of the few Jewish under officers in Romania.

After military service he decided to become an actor and entered into Segalesko's troupe, where he acted only one year and then went over to the Romanian vaudeville stage. Here he became known to a Jewish singer from Russia, Mary, with whom he married and together with her, mainly as a dancer in the national Romanian costumes, performing in vaudeville numbers.

A short time later they had together went on a tour across Russia, performing international songs and dance, and then with Segalesko's troupe toured across Russia.

In the beginning of the twentieth century, they arrived in America where they again performed international songs and dance.

Even though F. was a knaper Jew in Yiddish, they had him taken into the union Local 5, and after a short time he became the secretary and later the manager of the local union. With the proper forms from both or the Actors Unions, he became a member of the Yiddish Actors Union.

Acting for several years in insignificant father roles in which he excelled with his beautiful tenor voice, F. later became a stage director [?] in the garden theatre, then in the Metropolitan Opera House in Philadelphia.

In 1927 F. opened a restaurant in Philadelphia, where he, on 12 December of the same year, suddenly passed away from a heart attack, and he was brought to his eternal rest by the Yiddish Actors Union on the cemetery grounds of the Theatrical Alliance in New York.
 

M. E. from Kupershmidt and Olivenboym.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 3, page 2142.
 

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