Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Feyvele Fridman

 

Probably born in the beginning of the fiftieth year in Romania. One of the first Jewish actors during the competition between Avraham Goldfaden and "Professor" Horowitz.

About him B. Gorin writes:

"In the province, he [Horowitz] met with Grodner, and steeped with a hatred for Goldfaden, they put together a company and set out, returning to Bucharest to learn with Black(?).

The troupe now had the names of both Grodner and Horowitz, and the latter here had also taken a place as an actor, together with them  there also arrived Feyvele Fridman."

"Professor" Horowitz for a long time continued to act with F. in Romania, but after that as Horowitz went away from there, F. also took to wandering, and thus we found him in the beginning of the eightieth year acting in London and in those clubs, and at the end of 1886 he acted, together with Jacob P. Adler, Aba Schoengold, Anna Held, Keni Lipzin, the Grodners et al, in the Princes Club, as the turmoil, due to the fire alarm, had in 1887 precipitated the death of seventeen people and because of this, the Yiddish actors had to discontinue their further acting and emigrate. F., together with Adler, Lipzin et al, with the material assistance, created for them by the head rabbi Dr. Adler[?], traveled to Chicago, where they began after Passover 1887 to perform in the "Madison Street" Theatre.

 

F. then acted in various troupes across America, and in 1903 passed away in New York.

F. excelled as a character-comic and especially was well-known as "Shabti golm" in "Di farblondzhete neshomus" by Joseph Lateiner.

 

  • B. Gorin -- "History of Yiddish Theatre", Vol. I, pp. 197, 242; Vol. II, pp. 49, 51.

  • Jacob P. Adler -- "Mayn leben", "Di naye varhayt", N. Y., 7 April 1925.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 6, page 5131.
 

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