Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Bella Gudinsky
(Bela Gudinska)

 

G. was born on 24 July 1877 in Suwalki, Poland. Her father was the owner of a small school, in which he learned Hebrew, polish and German by himself. A mashkhil (cultured person), traditional.

In 1880 G.'s mother passed away, and her stepmother, who was very religious, gave her a religious education. G. learned in a cheder and worked with a seamstress until an aunt called for her to come to America, to where G. traveled to with an older sister. Here G. became a tailor and learned in an evening school. Through her friend she was lead into the Goldfaden club, that staged Goldfaden's operettas. Here there wasn't the possibility for her to act, because he didn't have a voice. First when she became a member in the "Goldfaden Young Dramatic Club" (Director Cesar Greenberg), she recited there and that enabled her to perform in the Oriental Theatre as "the daughter in Feinman's "Dem foters kallah". Since that time she acted in various clubs until Kessler saw her act as the "grefin" in the play "Di grefin als betlerin" and recommended the theatre for her. But for a certain time she had to remain in the chorus, until Adler got her a small role in the "Ekdh", and first when she performed in the play "Shmr Yisrael" for Dina Feinman who had become ill. G was taken out of the chorus and engaged as an actress.

For seventeen years G. acted under Edelstein's management with Adler, Kessler, Thomashefsky, Moshkovitsh, Mogulesko and Kalich. At first in dramatic roles, then mother and roles of intrigue.

 

After a long break, G. acted in 1928 for a short time in English in the comedy "It is tu lef".


M.E.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 1, page 467.
 

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