Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Morris Kenig
(Chliwner)
 

 

K. was born in 1892 in Warsaw, Poland, to Orthodox parents.

As a child he sang in Gozik's school, and from there through Dr. Rozental (first husband of Paula Prilutski) he was taken in, at the age of ten, to the chorus of "Shulamis" in Polish (Yiddish theatre then was forbidden.) He developed a strong desire for the stage, and when he grew up he performed together with youths in the home of a friend, "Jacob with his Son", performing as "Yakov." He took [zeyer oys] and [dos farshtarkt nokh bey] him more the will to the stage.

K. participated afterwards in the various Yiddish children's troupes on the Jewish street. After he became older, he became an employee in a bookshop. The desire for the theatre [tlyet] still took over him, and two years later he became through actor Adolph Fenigstein aroused as a professional in Tsipkus' provincial troupe, but not as an actor, but as a prompter. From there he went over to the Elizeum Theatre in Warsaw as a prompter, and afterwards toured with Rappel across Russia (often alone directing the troupe), where he lived through the pogroms and the Revolution.

In 1920 K. came to America, where he performed on the stage and also prompted. In 1927 he made, together with his wife, the soubrette  Betti Kenig, a tour across Europe, returning again to

America, where he further prompted, wrote over a play, "edited" plays, and directed the guest appearances of his wife. On 17 November 1954 K. passed away in New York [buried in the Yiddish Theatrical Alliance society plot at Mt. Hebron Cemetery in Flushing, New York -- ed.].


Sh. E.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 4, page 3120.
 

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