Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Jacob Milch


M. was born on 24 December 1866 in Warsaw, Poland, into a religious, poor family. He learned in a cheder. Later he worked as a carver, and a the same time, as a meschil (cultured, intelligent person) he [opgegeben] with Haskalah.

In 1891 he went away to America, where he had at first worked as a carver, then he was a merchant of [tsukervarg] and he became a chocolate maker.

In 1891 he debuted with a satire on anarchism in "Di arbeyter tseytung", then he became permanent publicist and feuilletonist in the "Forward' and "Tsukunft", of which  he in 1907 also was editor. Later he wrote many articles and papers about secular and Yiddish plays, Marxist, territorialist, cynicism, et al.

In 1892 M. participated in the discussion, which was initiated in the New York "Di arbeyter tseytung" between Jacob Gordin and the readers of the newspaper, due to Gordin's adaptation of Goldfaden's plays "Mlits yushr" and "Moshiakhs tseytn".

In 1906 in Warsaw's publishing house "Di proletarishe velt" there was published "Gerhard Hauptmann, "Di veber (The Weaver)", a drama in five acts, translated by Jacob Milch [1906, 92 pp., 16 in the same year also in Vilna it was published, etc. Ben-Gur's translation of the same play].

In his book "Idishe problemen" (N. Y. 1920), he also published articles about Asch's "God of Vengeance" and about "Shylock".

  • Z. Reyzen -- "Lexicon of the Yiddish Literature", pp. 402-406.

  • Zalmen Zylbercweig -- "Hintern farhang", Vilna, 1930, pp. 118-139.

  • I. Rapoport -- Gerhart hautpmann, "Vokhnshrift", Warsaw, 45, 1932.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 2,  page 1216.
 

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