Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Yakov Nisenboym

 

N. was born in 1894 in Konskowola, Lublin region, Poland, to poor Chasidic parents. He learned from his father and later in a Beit HaMedrash. Due to his father's marriage to a second wife, he left when he was very young for Warsaw, where he became an errand boy in a tobacco-[sklad], and due to his quick perception,  he worked with a prominent author. Here he [varft] himself to the same education, interested himself [tark] with Yiddish literature, with Yiddish theatre -- especially with the....founded "Artistic Corner".

By the outbreak of the world war, down on his material status, he settled in the town of Kurov, where he dedicated himself to the founding and development of social institutions, and together with several intelligent youths, he founded here a Yiddish cultural association, a people's university, gave out a journal, created a large library and founded a dramatic circle, in which he was active as the director, regisseur and technical leader. Here he also performed as a lecturer of Yiddish theatre problems. The cultural activity in Kurov also had an influence on those around the villages.

Two yers later he came to Lublin, where N. made attempt at various incomes, until he debuted with a report in the "Lublin togblat", then there he wrote from time to time. Later he acted as an editor, and after Stupnitski's departure, he took over the leadership of the editing.

 

Beyond his active work in various societal and artistic institutes in Lublin, N. caught the attention of the Yiddish theatre about whom he wrote often under the pseudonym of "A shvartser" articles and reviews in the "Lublin togblat". N.'s home in Lublin is also the frequent home of Yiddish artists.

N.'s wife, Bela Shapiro, also publishes from time to time reviews about Yiddish theatre.


Sh. E. from Shlomo Sheynberg.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 2, page 1423.
 

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