Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Berl Padovitsh
 

 

P. was born in 1899 in Lithuania.

He later moved to Kremenchug, Ukraine, where he learned at the local gymnasium and studied later at the university in Kiev, while at the same time attending the Kiev Dramatic Studio.

In 1916 he debuted with his own composition "Der groyl fun der melakhma" and founded a dramatic circle in Kremenchug, in which he the also later participated with the "Habima player" Yitzhok Goland, and Yehudit Narovlanskaya, a member of the Yiddish kamer- (Camera) theatre.

In 1918 he wrote the play "Der kantonist" and "Der ytum", which he also put on in Kremenchug. Later he put on the play in other cities with Joseph Brandesco.

Since 1919 he has been active, participating as a member of the arts committee in the department for "People's Education".

In 1920-1 he was a parser[?] for the theatre committee in Kremenchug and the entire Gubernia, [tsugleykh] to the reviews of the Yiddish and Russian theatre.

P. also founded and directed two drama studios for infants [minderyorike] and for adults for professional unions and clubs and directed the experimental productions through emotions created and directed during the play[?], from an earlier prepared text.

At the beginning of 1922 he founded in Lithuania a drama studio, with which he also directed Sholem Aleichem's "Dos groyse gevins (The Big Win)" and Osip Dymov's "Yoshke muzikant (Yoshke the Musician)" and "Der eybiker vanderer (The Eternal Wanderer)".

Later he went to Eretz Yisrael, where he created a drama circle, the amicable [gemlekhe] in South Africa, where he immigrated to in 1927.


Sh. E.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 3, page 1601.
 

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