Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Max Pine
 

 

Born on 30 April 1866 in Lubavitch, Mohilev Gubernia, White Russia. His father was a note writer (for pidyoynes, i.e. payments to Chasidic rabbis for advice, etc. -- ed.) for Rabbi R' Mendele Shneyerson, then a businessman. At age three P. became an orphan, and P. spent his childhood in poverty. At age nine his mother sent him away to Velizh, where he became an apprentice at a printing shop.

After a year-long wandering, P. at the age of nineteen he arrived in America, where he was taken into a tailor shop, and later he became one of the major figures and an important figure in the "Right" Jewish Workers Movement as an organizer, a very popular speaker and writer.

P. manifested a tremendous interest in the Yiddish Actors Union, and also was the first president of the "Folks farband kunst-teater".

On 2 March 1928 P. passed away in New York and was brought to his gravesite at the cemetery (plot) of the "Arbeter Ring (Workman's Circle)".

About his theatrical activities, Joseph Rumshinsky writes:

"Pine was very tightly connected with the Yiddish theatre, but he never was an employee delegate in a theatrical union. The Actors Union, at one time, did not have any delegates, and hired him as

their delegate, and at the first meeting only had sent him with a missive to the theatre managers, but he is still, up to today, owed the answer that he never brought, in fact he was never inside, but until his last minute he was close to the Yiddish theatre".


Sh. E. from Kalman Marmor.

  • Zalmen Reyzen -- Di perzenlikhkeyt, dos leben un di thetigkeyt fun ngenose maks peyn, "Forward", N. Y., 4 March 1928.
     

  • Joseph Rumshinsky -- Maks peyn un der idisher teater, "Rumshinsky-bukh", N. Y., 1931, pp. 60-61.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 3, page 1759.
 

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