Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Yakov Serbsky
(Blum, Yakovliev)

 

S. was born 1892 in Kremenchug, Crimea. According to Yonah Radinov, his father was a gabai. He received his education from a middle school. In 1912, according to S.'s autobiography, he came into Russian drama in Poltava, where he had begun to act under the name of Yakovliev. After acting for a year in a range of Russian cities, in 1917, he went over to Kherson and Russian operettas. In Kherson, he also participated in Yiddish in the troupe of the Kurik brothers, and he acted in Sholem Aleichem's "S'fidlt nit". He also was the secretary of the Artists Union. In 1919 he returned to perform in Russian in Novotsherkask, Taganrog, Novorosisk, and from there traveled to Yugoslavia, where he for eight years time directed his own troupe in Serbian, and there took the name "Serbsky".

In 1928 he, under the name of Serbsky, came to Riga and entered into the "New Yiddish Theatre" under the direction of Julius Adler, and he remained to perform in Yiddish in Riga's Yiddish theatre. In 1929-30 he acted in Kovno's new Yiddish theatre. In 1931 he was in Poland and Lithuania and then returned to the Riga Yiddish Meutis Theatre. In 1939 he acted with the guest-starring Max Perlman and Gita Galina, and then went off to Belgium, where he was captured by the Nazis, who had him killed.

S.'s wife, Maria Larska, a Jew, was a soubrette-prima donna on the Russian stage. His brother, the Russian coupletist Chigorov, had in his elder years married the Yiddish actress Sara Brez and also crossed over to the Yiddish stage and was killed in the Riga Ghetto.

 

Sh. E. and Sh. E. from Yonah Radinov.
M. E. from Max Perlman and Israel Segal.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 5, page 4372.
 

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