Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Yenta Serdatski
(Reybman)


Born in 1879 in Aleksot, near Kovno, Lithuania, into a poor, important family. Father -- a dealer of used furniture, a Jew, a scholar, who also had given his daughters a grintlekhe Jewish education. S. had in her youth read a lot in German, some in Russian, and also in Hebrew. In her home there came together the young Yiddish poets, among them also Avraham Reyzen, and through them S. became an eyfrike reader of the modern Yiddish literature.

At first when the Russian Revolution (1905) aroused a desire in her  to write, and as a mother of children she left her village and traveled to Warsaw, where she courageously through Y. L. Peretz -- she debuted in "Veg" (1905), with tthe story "Mirel".

1907 -- immigrated to America, where she for the first time attracted a livelihood from a soup kitchen that was maintained in New York. At the same time, however, she published stories in the local Yiddish periodical editions, even in the "Forward". A part of this volume ("Geklibene shriftn, also known as the Hebrew Publishing Company, N. Y.") included the following: "Oyf der vakh" (a drama in one act and two scenes), "Turikgekumene" (a dramatic scene), "Branka" (a dramatic scene), and "Beym viegel" (a dramatic scene of party life).

Besides these, she published the following one acters: "Shpilerey" ("Tsukunft", N. Y., August 1913), "Oh, di liebe!" (a dramatic scene, printed in the "Forward", N. Y., 11 June 1921), "Di grine" (a dramatic scene, printed in the "Forward", N. Y., 18 October 1921), and "Eyferzukht" (a dramatic scene, printed in the "Forward", N. Y., 23 January 1922).

Lately, S. has written very little, and makes her living now by managing furnished apartments in New York.

  • Z. Reyzen -- "Lexicon of Yiddish Literature", Vol. II, pp. 684-86.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 2, page 1524.
 

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