Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Kalman (Kolya) Tepper

T. was born in 1879 in Odessa, Ukraine, into a family of intelligentsia. He received a good Jewish education and completed a course of general studies. He continued onto the Jewish National Movement as an ekhd-hemist, T., thanks to  his speaking ability, became very popular early on. He also was a delegate to one of the first union congresses.

During the first Russian revolution he was allowed into the "Bund," and he acted in an important role among the student youth in the foreign colonies. After the October days of 1905, T. was arrested. He fled in 1907, together with his wife, to Berlin and from there he went to America. He went over to anarchy, later to individualism, grouping around the circle of the then young poets Moshe Varshe, Zishe Landau, Moishe Nadir and later also H. Leivick.

After the March Revolution (1917), he went away to Russia, where he lived mostly in Saratov, studying German in that university. In 1920 he was brought to Vilna and Warsaw, where he held presentations and lived to give lectures in the English language. In 1922 he traveled back to the Soviet Union, where in Leningrad he graduated from the university as a jurist and settled in Vieliki Ustog, Archangelesk Gubernia, as a researcher for a magistrate.

T. translated Henryk Ibsen's "Der kleyner elf" (publisher Max Meyzel, New York), and together with Moshe Varshe translated Anton Chekov's plays "The Water Bird," "Uncle Vanya", and "The Cherry Orchard" (publisher Max Meyzel, New York, 1911.) All three Chekov plays in 1923 were [under the direction of Zalmen Reyzen] also published by Vilna publisher B. A. Kletskin, under the title "Di meyv", "Der karshn-gortn" and "Feter Vanya".

T. also translated George Brandes' "Henryk Ibsen" (publisher Max G. Meyzel, New York, 1918) [p. 168].


M. E. from Zalmen Reyzen.

  • Z. Reyzen -- "Lexicon of the Yiddish Literature", Vol. I, pp. 1183-86.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 2,  page 888.
 

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