Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Shmuel Vulman


V. was born on 12 February 1896 in Kalushin, Warsaw region, Poland, into a poor, Chasidic family.

He learned in a cheder, Beit HaMedrash, later, through [his own culture=zelbstbildung], acquired secular knowledge.

In 1917 he settled in Warsaw.

From his younger years he was active with the Left Poaeli Zion, and since 1919 he began to publish songs, also later articles, feuilletons, reviews, and translations.

Since 1924 he had published several works and was a permanent collaborator in the "Groshn-bibliotek" for which he had written very many entire brochures.

In 1921 in the publishing house "Phoenix", Warsaw, he published dramatizations of Victor Hugo's novel "Der tiran fun padua".

Until September 1939 V. had lived in Warsaw, where he also had (was in) the ghetto -- according to B. Mark -- under the name "L. Pelzner", reading his drama "Naftali", which the written hand must be found among the Lodz material of the Yiddish historical commission.

Shortly thereafter the Germans had taken Poland, and V. had fled to Bialystok, that then was under Soviet rule, where he was however pursued due to his what was then his critical attitude to Bolshevism. He was taken away from there, living in a village around Kremenets, Volin, and after the German assault on the Soviets (June 1941) he, together with the writers Sh. Zaromb and Yerakhmiel Neyberg, were taken away from Kremenets and there killed by the Nazis.

  • "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre", New York, 1931, Vol. I, p. 644.

  • "Lexicon of the New Yiddish Literature", New York, 1960, Vol. 3, pp. 254-255.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 5, page 4782.
You can read Shmjuel's initial Lexicocn biography, which can be found in Vol. 1, by clicking here.
 

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