Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Yehuda Leib Wolman
 

 

Born on 29 November 1880 in Konskovolye, Lublin Gubernia, Poland, a son of Hebrew writer Mendl Volman. Until the age of twenty he learned general studies and at the same time also his mother tongue and arithmetic, afterwards becoming an auto-didact and was introduced to European literature. From his calling as a manufacturer, W. worked at first as a bookkeeper with Sava Morozov in Warsaw and afterwards became manager for the same firm. W. debuted with feuilletons while known as "Yhlum" in "Hatsufah", and afterwards he published stories in "Hatsfirah" -- also he debuted in Yiddish in Petersburg's "Tog" and later printed stories and theatre critiques in the Yiddish periodicals and Hebrew press in Warsaw. Since 1924 he has settled in the Land of Israel as a correspondent for "Moment" in Warsaw and other newspapers in London and New York.

W. composed "Di letzste khshmunays" or "Kenig hurdus" (historical drama in 4 acts, Warsaw, 1907, p. 48, 16), that was performed in 1907 in Warsaw by L. Rappel, "Dos brenende hoyz" (a lebensbild in 4 acts, published by Z. Reznik, Warsaw 1909, p. 50, 16), performed by Meerson in 1908 in the Lodz Grand Theatre, "Der shtroyener almn", (an operetta in 3 acts by Y. L. Wolman [almuny], Warsaw Tre"t, p. 98, 16), performed in Warsaw's Elyzeum Theatre (with Michalesko, Charaz and St. Clair in the chief role. The operetta was staged after a break of a season), and "Eliahu" (a mystery in six scenes, published by A. Gitlin, Warsaw 1922, p. 99, 16).
 

Sh. E.

Zalmen Reyzen -- "Leksikon fun der yidisher literatur (Lexicon of Yiddish Literature)", Vol. I, pp. 891-92.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 1, page 641.
 

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