Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Eliyahu Zaludkowski
(Elias; Zaludkovski)
 

 

Born in 1886 in Meytse (Mozyr), Grodno Gubernia, Polish Lithuania, and was raised in Kalish, where his father, R' Noakh Lider, arrived there as city cantor. He learned Shemash and Puskim with the Kalish rabbi R' Shimon Hornstein, and at the same time general subjects with a private teacher. From childhood on he manifested musical qualities.

At the age of twelve, he wrote music (most of the time he adapted his father's compositions) for the operetta "Di royber-baron (The Robber Baron)", from an article eynvoyner Shmuel Rozenfeld. The operetta for a long time was performed in Kalish and in its nearby communities. Z. at that played the violin and conducted the orchestra.

1906-8 -- Z. participated as a chorus singer in Jacob Bleichhman's Berlin Yiddish troupe, for which he also wrote music for the staged operetta.

1909 -- completed Berlin's conservatory, and then received from the Peterburg conservatory the title "Fraye kinstler", later becoming a cantor in Warsaw, in Rostov-on-Don, and was for three years Premier in the Rostov imperial opera, and for four years was a professor of singing and music theory in the Rostov gev. imperial conservatory. Later he again became cantor and concertist.

 Z. composed many synagogal compositions and melodies for songs of Yiddish poets, and had written many articles about music and issued several large compositions-articles. Z. also prepared to publish in Detroit America, where he had settled, a "Lexicon of Jewish Cantors and Composers".
 

Sh. E.

  • Z. Reyzen -- "History of Yiddish Literature", Vol. I, 1029-30.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 1, page 745.
 

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