Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Harry Zayderman

 

Born in 1919. His parents were the Yiddish actors Chana Lerner and David Zayderman. He was raised in Berlin, Germany by family. He completed the gymnasium and studied as a medical doctor, but due to the Hitler regime he had to interrupt his studies, and together with his parents went away to Poland, to Warsaw, where they were then put into the ghetto He had never thought about acting in theatre, but the changed living conditions had also moreover gefirt.

Jonas Turkow writes about this:

"Suddenly he was deported for a non-average-ability actor. Harry Zayderman was a pest-born student (with a head above his father), with a beautiful, bright face, a beautiful pronunciation, and a very large stage ability.

He didn't have his father's voice, but he exceeded him in acting talent.

His parents was very welcoming and proud of him, and they actually had a right. David Zayderman was a big joker, and in this connection did not omit the opportunity to say: 'From my big vocals and Chana's (his wife Chana Lerner) great soubrette-like temperament, there came into the world a great dramatic talent. "To gey, zay a khokhem."

 

Z., together with his parents, had worked in Teben's 'camp.' From there they were sent away to the Poniatowa camp near Lublin. However, shortly thereafter, the Germans had the camp destroyed, and due of the Jewish heroes' uprising, the Jewish underground led away from there some Yiddish actors who were wounded, and among them were Z. and his parents. However, they were captured in Lublin and sent away to Majdanek, where on 3 November 1934, under the tenor of Strauss' "Vienna Waltz," they were killed.


Sh. E. from Erna Zayderman

  • Jonas Turkow-- "Wandering Stars," Buenos Aires, 1953, Volume 1, pages 100-107.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 5. page 4026.
 

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