Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Velvl Zbarzsher
(Benjamin Wolf Ehrenkranz)

more to translate....

 

Z. was born [according to his gravestone -- 1826; according to the J. E. -- 1812; according to Professor M. Weissberg -- 1819; according to the Zbarzsh metric director Feierstein -- 1823] in Zbarazsh, Eastern Galicia. His father was a pious shokhet (ritual slaughterer) and scholar. Z. received a traditional Jewish education. From childhood on he manifested a great ability and an exceptional sharfzin, and already as a youth could learn well. Under the supervision of the Haskalah trends, which were then entirely in the neighboring cities of Brody and Tarnopol, Z. began to return to "trif-psul": covertly reading Hebrew Haskalah books and snacked a little on European culture.

In order to dismiss him as an epicurus, Z.'s father farknst to eighteen or nineteen years old. About his writing, A. Litwin: "Velvl was a melamed in Zbarazsh, but he wasn't a simple melamed. He taught Tenach to the children with Mendelzon's explanation in the "Ashkenazi translation" (German translation). In a Chasidic rabbi he hadn't praised, and in the earlier times he used to make songs for him at the rabbi's. Additionally, he wasn't pious and as a independent person, a proud nature, he had not strongly retained his audience. ... Finally the town hadn't been known to bear with his epicurus, m'hot im farmsrt baym rev", and later: "... Velvl married his wife, as God and as a good and pious person [following] the commandments. He took a Zbarzsh young woman, a pious person, an obergloybishe and an umvisnde. Even in his youth, he was captured by epicurus thoughts. His wife could not

understand him. His life was a sad one, and soon they came to be divorced. This was the fact. The legend had his some parputst". According to D. I. Silberbusch.... more to translate, [begin five lines f. bottom of p. 758.]
 


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 1, page 758.
 

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