Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Morris Zeidman
 

 

Born in March 1884 in Teplik, near Uman, Ukraine. He learned in a cheder, then in a yeshiva in Karsen, where his father was cantor. From age six he sung as a choirboy with his father. Losing his parents very early, he was raised by his grandfather in Uman, and there he sang with Cantor Shneyer in the new city synagogue, as well as with Cantor Abrahamale from Talne, until he lost his "knabn-voice." And at this time he was troubled. He became a hat maker, but this drew him to sing, and when he had, at the age of eighteen, felt that he had become a tenor, he joined the Yiddish theatre and debuted at the Pavilion Theatre as one of the three bridegrooms in "Shulamis." Then he went over to the chorus and into small roles, to M.D. Waxman in London's Standard Theatre. In 1904-05, through the actor Karl Gutentag, he became engaged as the first lover for his troupe in Argentina. In 1907 he arrived in America, where he became a member o the actors' union Local 5, performed with "single turns" in the Broome Street Music Hall, and through Nathan Goldberg was enlisted to play in the "sketches." Soon thereafter he entered into legitimate theatre, at first in Boston (with Jacob Kalich and Molly Picon), a long time with Samuel Goldinburg, in Philadelphia's Garden Theatre with Ludwig Satz, and during his last years, in the Hopkinson Theatre (Manager Oscar Green). Due to illness he stopped acting, and on 25 June 1950 he passed away in New York, where he was brought to his eternal rest.

Z.'s younger brother, Bennie, at first was a Yiddish actor and later became a cantor.


Sh. E. by his brother Bennie Zeidman.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 4, page 2574.
 

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