Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Adela Zinger
 

 

Z. was born cir 1862 in Sherzadz, Poland.

Her father was a violinist, her mother a good [?], the former Countess Dembska[?].

She attended a school and also learned music. However, due to the bad treatment she received by her stepmother, she fled to her close[?] in Warsaw and together with her sister went around for years as a singer (she sang and danced). Working the entire time in a non-Yiddish environment, was in contact with the Yiddish theatre quartet with her brother Shimon (Shliferstein), Rothstein, Feinstein and Berl Bernstein that surprised, then she went with the quartet over Russia, until they were in Pinsk where she worked in Shomer's troupe and acted in the play "Der treyfniak". Afterwards, she went back to London, where she acted with Smit in the Princess Club, performing already as a prima donna.

After she married actor Julius Prond, Z. went around with the Yiddish theatre across the English province, acting also in London and she went off to America, where she worked in New York as "Dinah" in "Bar kochba". Later Z. acted for several years in English vaudeville under her husband's direction in Baltimore at the Prince Street Theatre.

However, longing after her father, Z. went back to London, where she acted for two years in sketches in Yiddish, participating only in plays during the afternoon performances.

Z.'s greatest success was as a dancer of Polish national dances.

On 4 April 1922 Z. passed away in London and came to her eternal rest at Eastham Manor Park Cemetery.


M. E. from her husband Julius Prond, Elias Rothstein and H. Feinstein.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 1, page 789.
 

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