Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Pol'nishe
(Poylishe)

more to translate....


The name of a group of Broder Singers and folksingers, who used to tour across the former Austria-Hungary and perform most of the time in Vienna and Budapest. The most popular of the group were: Jacob and Pepi Litmann, Leopold and Sara Kaner, Sholem Podzamtshe, Yonah Reyzman, Herman, Moshe Saltshe and Pepi Vaynberg, Philip and Sally Weisenfreund, Sam Ludvik, Chana Shtrudler, Shtayner and his wife, Mendele Rotman, the brothers and wife Klug.

Performing in taverns or gardens, used such "societies" (troupe) consisting of two, three, up to as many as eight persons (men and women) -- dependent on local conditions and also the number of those "entering" professional colleges: which for a folksinger was fortuitous barbaygeforn. He could oyfgenumen vern in the "society". In that respect, very professional friendships were umbagenetst.

In the first World War, during the Russian invasion of Galicia, the Vienna "Yiddish bine" had been headed by most of the former "Pol'nishe", adding in the entire Lemberg theatre troupe that had left for Vienna. Men hot zikh geteilt mit vifl men hot "gemakht".

At the top of the repertoire of the "Polnishe" was the same as from the other folksingers: "Popular and badkhanim songs, sometimes with "costumed" performances and "comedies" [short acting scenes]. Initially when they were over in the larger performance halls (in "Stefanyu" in Vienna, in Wertheim's Variete and Budapest), they also began to stage "kestelekh" -- reduced, tailored theatre plays that took a half hour to be performed. When the audience of each city had not..... more to translate....

 


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 3,  page 1640.
 

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