The Synagogues of Europe
PAST AND PRESENT
Hungary

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          EXHIBITION

 
Below you will find a series of postcards that depict various synagogues that currently or once stood in Europe. Most of these photographs have been purchased, taken, or otherwise obtained by those visiting these towns and cities, and they have been subsequently submitted to the Museum to be placed online.  Some of these synagogues might still be extant, i.e. still being used as synagogues, but others lay abandoned and perhaps in a state of disrepair, or are currently being used for other purposes. Some have been restored.

Current town names are used to indicate the location of each synagogue.

The Museum welcomes further submissions, as this exhibition is forever ongoing and evolving. Please include the name of the country, town/city, synagogue (if known), and the month and year the photo was taken.

Please click on the thumbnail photos to see the enlarged versions.
 
 
HUNGARY    
BALASSAGYARMAT, HUNGARY (bef 1939)

After the outbreak of World War II, the Jewish inhabitants of Balassagyarmat were forced into a ghetto and subsequently many were sent to labor camps.

Each 22 Sivan a Yahrzeit candle is lit by those who lost loved ones in the gas chambers of Auschwitz in 1944. On this date, about 1,500 citizens of Balassagyarmat, Hungary, virtually the entire population of the town, perished. Only 225 Jews returned to the town after the war had ended in 1945.

The first synagogue in Balassagyarmat was destroyed by fire in 1776, but subsequently was rebuilt and dedicated in 1868.
Békéscsaba, HUNGARY (2004)

BUDAPEST, HUNGARY (2005 and later)
Dohány Street Synagogue

This synagogue is the largest in Europe (seats 3,000) and  the second largest in the world.

Photo, bottom left: Fountain in the Raoul Wallenberg Memorial Park outside the synagogue.

BUDAPEST, HUNGARY (2005)
Kobanya Templom  Synagogue

address: Cserkesz Utca, Kobanya, Budapest, Hungary.

"The Kobanya synagogue was derelict for some years, and I was told that it was used as a storage facility. In recent years, the building was renovated as a church with funds from a Scandinavian-based church. A large crucifix was placed at the location of the Aron Hakodesh (Holy Ark), but Hebrew inscriptions were retained." - Howard Elton
EGER, HUNGARY  
ESZTERGOM, HUNGARY (2006)



From Wikipedia.

 
Gyöngyös, Hungary  
GYOR, HUNGARY (2004)

 

 
GYULA, HUNGARY (2007)  
Hajdúböszörmény, HUNGARY  
KESZHELY, HUNGARY (2009)

 

 

Left photo from Wikipedia.

 

KISVARDA, HUNGARY

 


All photos copyright of Peter Spiro, owner of the Kisvarda ShtetLinks page. According to Peter, "The synagogue (now known as the Retkozi Muzeum) is located in a pleasant spot across from a little park beside the main square in Kisvarda, across the street from the public library."

MAD, HUNGARY (2003)

"Most Jews were put into this synagogue in 1944 or 1945 and then shipped to Auschwitz. There are memorial tablets with names. One of my relatives survived. Very few did.

There is also a shammes with a very large key. Mad was a Hasidic center

Very small and friendly town. I took the pictures in 2003. The synagogue is not consecrated and serves as a museum. " -Diane Rabson.

Photos courtesy of Diane Rabson, who holds the copyright to all four photos.
 



Makó, HUNGARY  

 

MISKOLC, HUNGARY (exterior 2005)
Kazinczy Street

This synagogue was built between 1856 and 1862.

Above left photo from Wikipedia.

 

Nyíregyháza, HUNGARY

Pécs, HUNGARY (lT. 2005)

 

 

Left photo from Wikipedia.

Siklós, Hungary  
SOPRON, HUNGARY

SZEGED, HUNGARY
New Synagogue

 

Bottom left and right photos from Wikipedia (2007)

SZOLNOK, HUNGARY  
TAPOLCA, HUNGARY  
TATA, HUNGARY  
Tiszafüred, HUNGARY

Tiszafüred, HUNGARY  
ZALAEGERSZEG, HUNGARY


Photo left from Wikipedia.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 











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