Lives in the Yiddish Theatre
SHORT BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE
aS DESCRIBED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"

1931-1969
 

Asher Leyb Nirenberg

 

N. was born in 1890 in Ruzhany, Grodno circle, Poland. His mother died when he was three, and N. was raised by his grandmother. Later N. moved to Lodz, where he completed Yorontshinski's school. In 1905 he became an employee in a silk business. Afterwards he learned to be electrical mechanic and later as a [zokn] worker. He traveled to Germany, and there N. acted in Cologne in Yiddish with an amateur group ("Simeon" in Gordin's "The Wild Man"), and then in Lodz, already as a professional, in the vaudeville houses, for which he also wrote "vaudeville" on his own.

In 1912 N. played "Pastor Manders" in H. Yedvab's offering of Ibsen's "Ghosts," and soon thereafter he joined the Skala Theatre (Director -- Adler-Serotsky), where he acted for several years. Later N. took a large part in the organization of member troupes, and he acted in the Polish province, also in the member troupe of Lodz's philharmonic.

In his latter years N. suffered a heart illness and was in the hospital more than on the stage.

N. was said to be an intelligent Yiddish performer and he aspired to a better Yiddish stage. For his evenings-of-honor, he used to always perform in better plays.

He was chairman in various troupe-ratn and several times was chosen to be part of the Lodz management of the Yiddish Artists Union in Poland.

 

He became paralyzed, and on 21 November 1928 he passed away in Lodz.

N.'s wife, Rachel (Bombe), for a short time acted on the Yiddish stage, and in the beginning of 1928 she passed away in Lodz.

  • Y. Rakov -- W. Neuhaus -- Asher Leyb Nirenberg, "Ilustitre vokh," Warsaw, 25, 1928.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 2, page 1425.
 

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