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  ERC > LEXICON OF THE YIDDISH THEATRE  >  VOLUME 5  >  NERA


Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre
BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE WHO WERE ONCE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE;
aS FEATURED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S  "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"


VOLUME 5: THE KDOYSHIM (MARTYRS) EDITION, 1967, Mexico City


 

Nechama
(Lipshitz, Kadish)


 

N.. was born in 1892 in Khatievitsh (Khotovizh -ed.), Mohilev Gubernia, Ukraine. She was raised in Bobruisk. Through her parents who were "amateurs" of the Yiddish theatre, N. had the opportunity to enter into the chorus of Genfer's troupe, with whom she toured across Russia and Lithuania. Later N. debuted as "Mirele" in "Di kishufmakherin" and acted in other small roles, but at the same time sang further in the chorus.

Initially in 1918, after her marriage to actor Kadish, she crossed over to Lipovski's Vilna Folks Theatre, where she received larger roles, and then went on a tour across Kovno, Koenigsberg, Memel, Berlin, Vilna (together with her husband and her brother Yosef Khash), later in Lodz's Skala Theatre (Directors-- Lazar and Shoshana Kahan), where she performed for the first time in Moshe Broderzon's translation of Kalmen's "Bayadera," and in other cities in Poland. In 1926 N. guest-starred with her husband and brother-in-law across Romania, Bessarabia, Transylvania, and then she returned to Poland, where she founded with her husband and brother-in-law an operetta troupe named "The Vilna Operetta Troupe," with whom they traveled across Poland. In 1928 N. acted in Krakow, then across Poland. In 1930 she guest-starred with the troupe in Kovno and from there in Riga's Yiddish Meutim Theatre. In 1932 she was in Krakow, performing in the operetta "Di persishe kallah," and then followed the same path to the stage as her husband.

Jonas Turkow writes:
"In the first large stage success there was in Kalman's 'Bayadera,' in which she played the title role. She drew attention

with her wonderful voice. She was one of best theatre singers of that time. If she had still trained her voice, she would certainly have grown into a world-class singer. People mention an interesting case. Once she became ill in her throat and went to a well-known Warsaw laryngologist, Dr. Kenigstein. He explicitly forbade her to sing, because otherwise she will lose her voice for three months altogether. Not looking at the prohibition, however, did not rethink her work and sang for years, until her end, with the same voice. It was a weakness, but she had everything covered with her singing. From the stage she presented herself very much thanks to her imposing figure with a true biblical face. With a pair of beautiful Shulamis eyes, as a human being she was very beloved by the member actors, and by everyone who came with her in contact with her. In every operettas in which she performed in the family troupe of her husband, she had an extraordinary success everywhere."

Sh. Bliacher writes:

"Nechama is a first-class actress in the operetta with her voice and appearance. In the drama, however, Nechama does not occupy any place. Kadish therefore wanders around with wife and brothers with a repertoire of songs. As American (shlager-operetn) became through Kadish bought [gekoyft] and with his ensemble performed. ...Kadish had with Nechama two beautiful daughters -- Sheine and Feigele. The younger one, Feigele, studied clavier in the Warsaw Conservatory. After completing the conservatory, she, along with the Khash troupe, toured as a pianist-accompanist. Later in Pinsk she got married to a medical doctor. The older daughter by nature was a very weak person and learned with a private teacher, then when the troupe used to settle for a longer period of time in the city."

When the Second World War broke out, N. was found with the troupe in Pinsk. She remained there even after her husband left for Vilna, and as Kacerginski writes in his book, "The Destruction of Vilna," she participated on 20 June 1941 in the production of Sholem Aleichem's "Der groyse gevins (The Big Winner)," under the direction of Henryk Szaro, but by morning, Vilna had been bombed by the Germans, and shortly thereafter, due to a stirh, a troupe of Yiddish actors were arrested, among them N., who was killed during the first shitung in July 1941 in Ponar.

  • "Lexicon of Yiddish Theatre," Warsaw, Vol. II, 1934, pp. 1416-1417.

  • Sh. Kacerginski -- "Destruction of Vilna," New York, 1947, pp. 226-227.

  • Jonas Turkow -- "Extinguished Stars," Buenos Aires, 1953, Vol. 2, pp. 173-177.

  • Sh. Bliacher -- eyn un tsvantsik un eyner," New York, 1962, pp. 44-48.

 


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 5, page 4003.
You can read Nechama's initial Lexicon biography from Vol. 2, by clicking here.
 

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