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  ERC > LEXICON OF THE YIDDISH THEATRE  >  VOLUME 5  >  IZZY ZALUZNIAK


Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre
BIOGRAPHIES OF THOSE WHO WERE ONCE INVOLVED IN THE Yiddish THEATRE;
aS FEATURED IN zALMEN zYLBERCWEIG'S  "lEKSIKON FUN YIDISHN TEATER"


VOLUME 5: THE KDOYSHIM (MARTYRS) EDITION, 1967, Mexico City

 

Izzy Zaluzniak


Born in 1910. Early on he worked in the Ukrainian theatre, then became an actor in Kiev's Jewish State Theatre for Young People.

Yona Radinow writes:

"As one writes, there was a human being always flashed with a smile of wisdom and humor. He served in the Soviet army and fell in captivity to the Nazis.

According to a communication from Kiev, Yiddish writer Ch. Maziansky, I looked up the journal "Novi mir," Volume 1 of the year 1963, where the Jewish war prisoners Leonid Volinsky, the only one who remained alive from the large group of Soviet war prisoners, recalls in his story, "Durkh der nakht (Through the Night)": A large group of Soviet war prisoners were brought to a Ukrainian Derfl Kovali, which is thirty-five kilometers northeast of the village of Piroti[n], Poltava region. Here they were stopped by a field, and a young German with a feminine smile gave a command: 'Jews, commissar and communists, get out beforehand! From the ranks there soldiers began to come out and put themselves in a row...

The time was running long and people [HOBN ZIKH GETSOYGN UN GETSOYN]... There arrived four-hundred Soviet combatants... Leonid Volinsky heard behind him a voice of a soldier Aptekorov with whom he was in one department, "Don't go." When no more of the soldiers came out, the young German cried out: "Help pick out Jews, commissars and communists. Whoever chooses, take their clothes, possessions." To Leonid Volinsky, one who was approached, asked: "And you, what?" Soon he was dressed naked, removed his watch, and occupied a place among the four-hundred of the death-sentenced Soviet Jews, commissars and communists. He wrote that he thought of nothing but this, that his own will not know where his tomb is...

The Nazi took ten men to one side. These ten dug a pit, and the next ten were FARSHIT LEBEDIK, and also the four hundred men perished. Leonid Volinsky was the only one of the group who miraculously survived.

He further writes that all died in silence... None of the Jews gave in to the Nazi hangmen. Of the four-hundred men he knew, only one. This was the artist of Yiddish theatre in Kiev -- Izzy Zaluzniak, a human being with a non-explicit humor. A highly talented actor. As all the others, he met his death in silence, and thereby gave up his grey, KUCHERAVE head..."
 

Sh.E. from Yona Radinow.


 

 

 

 


 

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Adapted from the original Yiddish text found within the  "Lexicon of the Yiddish Theatre" by Zalmen Zylbercweig, Volume 5, page 4468.
 

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